Rio de Janeiro State Cuisine Information


Information About Rio de Janeiro - Cuisine


Rio´s cuisine is uniform in one respect only: it is delicious. It is as varied as the multitude of nationalities that pass through the Cidade Maravilhosa. French, Italian, Japanese and Lebanese style restaurants vie with the more traditional Brazilian churrascarias, which serve an unlimited supply of perfectly cooked meats.
 
Being close to the sea of course means an unsurpassed selection of fine seafood, including fresh lobster, shrimp, shellfish, and numerous fishes. Another defining culinary experience is the juice bar, which is hugely popular in Rio. Fresh juice made with the fruit of your choice is available almost everywhere at any time of day.
 
Feijoada Brazil’s national dish, and also Rio’s most famous, is feijoada. This mouthwatering meat and bean casserole is served at almost every restaurant and at every family gathering. The diva of Rio´s dishes (and also Brazil’s national dish) was originally made out of leftovers to feed slaves. Feijoada requires lengthy preparation, usually a social activity with several family members milling around the kitchen. It is a delicious casserole consisting of black beans and a variety of dried, salted meats, which benefits from slow cooking and/or reheating. It may be prepared ahead of time and is traditionally eaten on Saturdays.
 
Feijoada is actually the main ingredient of a meal consisting of 7 dishes. It should be served with farofa, arroz Brasileiro (white Brazilian rice), hot pepper and lime sauce, couve (kale greens) and slices of fresh orange. Farofa de Azeite de Dendê Toasted cassava meal accompanies nearly all Brazilian main courses. The basic flour is available from grocers as farinha de mandioca (manioc flour). Melted butter can be used as an alternative to dendê oil (palm oil). The flour is simply fried lightly in the melted butter until both ingredients are fully combined to form a rich yellow color and a texture, which melts in your mouth.
 
Additional ingredients can be added, such as raisins, nuts and dried sausage. Molho de Pimenta e Limão This fiery pepper and lime sauce is an accompaniment to almost every Brazilian dish. It is made using tiny, hot crushed chilies, onion, garlic, lemon juice and salt and is served in a separate bowl to be added as desired.
 
Hope you enjoyed our Information About the Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – Cuisine

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